Revisiting a Portal to Media Literacy

from the Educause Learning Initiatives conference in Orlando.  This presentation is part self-critique and part extension of my earlier “Portal to Media Literacy” presentation:

ELI Presentation 2009

Wesch

Associate professor of cultural anthropology. Ed Traceur. Hacker. Car-free.

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3 Responses

  1. JLM says:

    Do we need Microsoft Silverlight to view the presentation?

  2. Mary says:

    The presentation was wonderful, Michael. The work you are doing with the students in all of your courses is inspiring. The Digital Ethnography course is an excellent way to engage students in the research process. The products that you are creating with the students are appealing. The media projects posted on YouTube are appealing. As the frame of references shifts from thinking of them as providing a commentary on student learning preferences, to thinking of them as a pedagogical challenge for professors our interpretation shifts. When those media projects become data in a research project, new interpretations evolve. As I listen to you reflect on your teaching and student learning and the community you are creating, i am reminded of many themes in Creativity, Wisdom, and Trusteeship: Exploring the Role of Education (2008) edited by Anna Craft, Howard Gardner, and Guy Claxton. They argue that good leaders and good educators have their WICS about them. They are wise (good problem finders and aware of stereotyped fallacies in thinking) they are intelligent (able to demonstrate ‘(historical memory’ and analysis), and they are creative (resilient, disinterested and able to empathize, emotionally connected) and they are good people.
    As a literacy teacher educator, I appreciate the work you are doing. The teachers in my courses are asking similar questions as you are–What does it mean to be literate? as we examine the role of beliefs, technologies, culture, and symbolic interaction on learning and literacy today.

  3. Mary says:

    The presentation was wonderful, Michael. The work you are doing with the students in all of your courses is inspiring. The Digital Ethnography course is an excellent way to engage students in the research process. The products that you are creating with the students are appealing. The media projects posted on YouTube are appealing. As the frame of references shifts from thinking of them as providing a commentary on student learning preferences to thinking of them as a pedagogical challenge for professors, our interpretation shifts. When those media projects become data in a research project, new interpretations evolve. As I listen to you reflect on your teaching and student learning and the community you are creating, I am reminded of many themes in Creativity, Wisdom, and Trusteeship: Exploring the Role of Education (2008) edited by Anna Craft, Howard Gardner, and Guy Claxton. The authors argue that good leaders and good educators have their WICS about them. They are wise (good problem finders and aware of stereotyped fallacies in thinking). They are intelligent (able to demonstrate ‘(historical memory’ and analysis). They are creative (resilient, disinterested and able to empathize, emotionally connected). In other words, they are good people.
    As a literacy teacher educator, I appreciate the work you are doing. The teachers in my courses are asking similar questions as you are–What does it mean to be literate? as we examine the role of beliefs, technologies, culture, and symbolic interaction on learning and literacy today.