“A Vision of Students Today” Transcript

Today’s child is bewildered when he enters the 19th century environment that still characterizes the educational establishment where information is scarce but ordered and structured by fragmented, classified patterns, subjects, and schedules.”

– Marshall McLuhan 1967

It these walls could talk …

What would they say?

If students learn what they do …

What are they learning sitting here?

The information is up here.

Follow along.

Follow.

Of course, walls and desks cannot talk.

But students can.

Open Google Document: A Vision of Students Today.

What is it like being a student today?

Add Collaborators.

Collaborators (200).

200 Students made 367 edits to this document,

and surveyed themselves,

to bring you the following message:

My average class size is 115.

18% of my teachers

know my name

I complete 49% of the readings assigned to me.

Only 26% … relative to my life

I buy hundred dollar textbooks that I never open.

My neighbor paid for class but never comes.

I will read 8 books this year

2300 web pages

and 1281 facebook profiles

I will write 42 pages for class this semester

And over 500 pages of email

I get 7 hours of sleep each night

I spend 1 ½ hours watching TV each night.

I spend 3 ½ hours a day online

I listen to music 2.5 hours a day

I spend 2 hours on my cellphone

3 hours in class

2 hours eating

I work 3 hours every day

3 hours studying

That’s a total of 26.5 hours.

I’m a multitasker.

I have to be.

I will be over 20,000 in debt after graduation.

I’m one of the lucky ones.

Over 1 billion people

Make less than one dollar a day

This laptop costs more than some people in the world make in a year.

When I graduate I will probably have a job

That doesn’t exist today

(showing scantron)

Filling this out won’t help me get there.

Or deal with …

war, inequality, ethnic conflict, pollution, (and many more)

I did not create the problems

But they are my problems

Some have suggested that technology (alone) can save us …

I facebook through most of my classes.

I bring my laptop to class but I’m not working on class stuff.

“The inventor of the system deserves to be ranked among the best contributors to learning and science, if not the greatest benefactors of mankind.”

- Josiah F. Bumstead

1841

… on the benefits of the chalkboard.

Writing on a chalkboard …

to be continued …

Wesch

Associate professor of cultural anthropology. Ed Traceur. Hacker. Car-free.

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135 Responses

  1. I think you are on to something here, and that this is a fabulous idea, I think the entire initiative is immense. The idea of having this on the web and that you are using a rich, interactive media (the blog), is awe-inspiring.

    This generation will see a fundamental shift in our societal thinking; we are no longer islands of isolated knowledge. Instead, we will be the generation that will raise each other up through collective learning.

    I continually see it in courses, students gather and form ideas, when a single student gets the idea, the idea fires a spark that is transmitted to the others like a wildfire.

  2. Kelly says:

    As an educator at a community college where no student is denied admission, I have been challenged by the enrollment of a number of poorly prepared and unmotivated students in my classes. My experience is probably similar to many other instructors teaching first and second year college students at any university, and I hope that the summary provided here reaches some of those students and instructors.

    It seems that many students who decide to go to college think of it as something they HAVE to do rather than something they WANT to do. Maybe their parents have pushed them into it, maybe they aren’t ready for the real world and use college as a way to put it off for a few years, or maybe they are used to an affluent lifestyle provided by their parents that they don’t want to give up yet can’t possibly attain without a degree. Many first and second year undergraduates also have no idea what they want to do and end up taking general education courses with a couple hundred other freshmen and sophomores, and are then further disheartened about the college experience they weren’t ready for in the first place.

    In any case, students who don’t want to be in college generally do not do well, and then they often blame their lack of interest on long, boring, expensive textbooks or teachers who don’t make the material relevant to everyday life. If the students wanted to be there and were genuinely interested in learning (either for the sake of learning or to further their knowledge in a particular subject), the instructors would seem more interesting, the textbooks not such a waste of money, and the students would make connections between the information and their lives (perhaps even without being prompted!). Of course there will always be the occasional boring class you have to take to graduate, and you may run into a professor who has been teaching the same material in the same way for so long s/he has forgotten that the students even exist, but to the student striving for a personal goal these classes are just little bumps in the road rather than the major roadblocks uninterested students make them out to be.

    So, students, I implore you to find out what you are interested in before you go to college and complain that what you are expected to learn is not relevant or interesting. I implore you to drop in and get to know your instructors before you complain that they don’t know your name. I implore you to find your own connections between the information you are learning and your life because your instructor cannot possibly know what is relevant to each student in the class. And finally, I implore you to turn off your iPODs, laptops, cell phones, and any other distracting items during class, listen to the lecture, ask lots of questions, and fully participate in meaningful discussions about the material. Maybe you can help your instructors develop new ways of teaching and learning that keep more students interested, even the ones that don’t really want to be there.

    And, instructors, I implore you to take time to make your lectures more interesting, to find new ways of having students interact with, think about, and apply the material (not just memorize it), and be open to teaching and learning ideas that students come up with, because after all they are the ones who need to learn the information.

  3. Mauro says:

    So you say that its technology’s fault that the teenagers spend 26.5 hours (wich is completely bullcrap, because I can hear music, be in facebook and eating at the same time, so make those 9 hours just 2. You said “26.5 hours” just for strengthen this whole stupid point) bullshitting around instead of paying attention to class? So you say that you “have to be” “””multi taskers””” because you have to go to class JUST 3 HOURS AND WORK 2 HOURS A WEEK?
    What the F***.
    If you take the notebook to class, use it, dont get into facebook.
    If you buy a book, read it all, not just the 42% because “26% of it is important to your life”, (Besides, who says or decides which subjects are important to your life or to your career? You yourself? Read how the careers are constructed before start complaining. You’re the kind of person that says that syntax does not will hel you in your life). All of them contribute to the supposed debt you’re going to have after graduation. Of course you’re gonna have a debt!, if you work just 2 hours a day. Not even part time, part-part-time.
    You’re waiting for your dad to come up and give you money?

    For Gods sake, nobody said “technology alone can save us”. And guess what, it cannot.
    Grab a book and learn something: Technology is everything in and between a spear and a notebook, and guess what, the spears saved a lot of caveman… its not just your little iPod and your shiny cute cellphone. Ah, the chalkboard is also technology, but we use it to write, not to hit other people with it.
    If you use it correctly, the technology lets you develop some other skills.

    “I did not create the problems, but they are my problems”, yeah, phone for you, Its Mr. Obvious and he says that its called life, and it can suck big time.

    This video made me lose the hope on all mankind.

    I think it sucked.

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  6. Ms. Quel says:

    I thought the idea behind the video was great but I just couldn’t agree with some of the “notes”.

    Real life doesn’t start happening after or because of college. REAL life happens every day! I learned wonderful things for the 7 months I was in college, but I’ve learned more than any books can hold in the 4 years since I dropped out to care for my autistic sister. I read books to expand myself on the things I can’t learn first hand. I feel like they have no idea how blessed it is to be able to ATTEND college in the first place. It is absolutely what you make of it. You’re going to have to grind out things that may be useless in your life but might not be useless to someone else. In the meantime you work hard and forge around for the things you really want. The things that ARE relative to your life or the life you want to live. I’ve noticed so many people my age coming out of college completely ignorant to what to do next. A job puts food on the table but it doesn’t HAVE to define you. Being able to have a job that you absolutely love is a blessing that 9/10 won’t happen.

    Being human automatically means you are a multi taker. I don’t have kids but I’m 23 years old and I wake up at 5 am every day. In the morning, I give multiple medicines to help my 4 year old sister. I feed her, dress her, entertain her and teach her, usually doing several of these at the same time. At work, I fill out forms, take calls, study things about the environment that aren’t necessarily relevant to my life but are relevant to my job. On my lunch, I budget finances and pay bills. I cook, clean, give baths and sing preschool songs in the evenings. By the time my day is done, there are at LEAST 10 things I planned to do that I didn’t get finished. I’d be damn grateful to get 7 hours of sleep a night. Maybe I should make a video about THAT!

    SERIOUSLY!

    I honestly do think that my best learning moments in class were when the teacher stepped away from the chalkboard and everyone was forced to join in. I know I wanted a personal learning experience, that’s why I chose a private college with a small student-teacher ratio. If you’re not going to take charge and change the system, then please don’t complain. Don’t stand by and do nothing.

  7. Don Eland says:

    I’m trying to comprehend the significance of this blog – - no small task in a document of 15,000 words that addresses psychology, careers, technology, philosophies for learning, science, third-world countries, religion, and frustrations about life in general.

    If this YouTube clip goes viral it will probably be, primarily, because of the observations of undergraduate students about the influence of technology on learning.

    I’ve noticed a new kind of intelligence in underclassmen that is unrecognized and unappreciated, but evident in this blog. The majority have an all-consuming passion to do something significant and won’t let anything get in their way – not even an outrageously expensive college education.

    Who has ever dealt with such fundamental dilemmas as now? All civilizations have probably viewed their time as revolutionary, but now we face undeniably unique issues driven by the magnitude and velocity of change in our “flattened” world (Thomas Friedman: The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century).

    If students want to learn things of significance, then one of their challenges is to solve problems being magnified by technology. Technologies deceive us because they have proliferated tools in a 10,000 year history of new and emerging tools. It’s all just tools.

    I want the same things as you, underclassmen, so, with hopes for achieving greater significance as a teacher, I commit to you to lecture less each semester and strive for relevance in my classes no matter where that leads us.

    What can you do for me?

  8. Matt Totherow says:

    “Some have suggested that technology (alone) can save us …”

    Trust me, I’m attending a technical university, and as far as classes go, technology is about the most detrimental thing to my GPA right now. Those 2300 web pages are going to be the end of my college career. Professors’ lectures being aided by PowerPoint isn’t helping either.

  9. renzen says:

    I don’t have much to say…
    “Change it or Blame it”

  10. greg says:

    first off – too many people are going to college/university. not just in numbers, but, people who should do otherwise. learn a trade, get a job.

    “higher education” is designed to prepare you for a number of different jobs, with differing complexity. if you don’t think the material is relevant, maybe it’s because you’re in the wrong field. maybe it’s because you are at the starting point, and cannot see its value in the end. if the relevance for everything i learned in my degree had to be explained each time a new topic was introduced, my degree would have taken twice as long.

    as for hours in a day and multitasking – when i was in first year (1998) i would watch tv while “studying” and eating. i would play quake II or euchre with people in residence rather than study. and i still spent hours on the net on my dialup connection. for a little while. and then i would work when i had to. it is the students’ responsibility to determine what they want to do, what they need to do to get there, and see if they can do it. nowadays, i’m finishing my PhD and still get distracted by things, mainly stuff on the net. i choose to spend time on facebook, youtube, playing online poker – but, when i have to, i get work done.

    in regards to regurgitating information (a comment someone made – i forget where i read it) rather than thinking critically – you need to know (and PROVE you know) the information first off. why bother to see if you can think critically upon a situation if you can’t get the facts straight.

    incorporating technology to aid in education might not be that great an idea. to me, it seems like a fad. radio, tv, home PC, internet – each promised grandiose things for education, and while they had their limited use each ended up as a medium for entertainment primarily.

    in my first year psych class, the lectures were recorded on video, and displayed in small classrooms. it allowed an easy approach to educating upwards of 3000 students. it also allowed the professor to incorporate diagrams, videos, graphs and other non-textual information seamlessly. from the ages of 7-18, i watched almost 7 hrs of tv everyday, believe it or not. my point: i like tv. BUT, the fact that the lectures were on tv did not make it more enticing. i only went to 2 classes after the midterm. why? it was an elective, and i knew i would just catch up on the info later.

    people think chalkboard’s, pencils, paper, erasers are outdated and unable to get the job done? give everyone calculators, laptops – looks impressive. does it make them smart?? no freakin way.

    whoever can do more with less – that’s who i’d want to be the leaders of tomorrow.

  11. Joe says:

    I work at a liberal arts college for Instructional Technology. I come from a family of educated people and grew up surrounded by friends and family who work as Teachers, Academic Administrators and Researchers.

    It’s been interesting to see the reaction to this video and to the response posted by the Lecturer from the UK. I think this debate is both old and new, but mostly old.

    First I think most generations of young people have some (greater or lesser) sense of entitlement, but I would say I believe the current generations of young people have a strong one. I would say though that it is coupled with a drive that will show itself as they age and produce many positive solutions to the things they now bicker about.

    Second, I think educators and older generations are not always given much credit by the young – this is by no means a new thing. History certainly shows us this is common.

    As far as technology’s impact on education – I think it’s undeniable. I work in a fairly traditional school but most faculty here use technology (even if it’s just a projector) on a daily basis. Online course management systems, computer software, video and audio, etc… are common in many schools in the US.

    A few people have made comments which suggest that young people’s technology use leads to less contact with people. I do not think this is true. Many of the most popular sites with young people connect them to others that they would otherwise only have written correspondence with. At my school, programs like Skype have been used to connect students here with professors and students in foreign countries via webcam and live audio – certainly an enriching and educational experience that could not otherwise take place.

    I do think that many American students are ungrateful for what they are offered. I also think that saying someone in another country has it much worse (which is very true) doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try to make things here even better. I do think we need to be careful to tell students up front that a college education guarantees absolutely nothing. Your life becomes what you put into it in effort, not money. I’m not sure college recruiters are too up front about that. I also think we need a more stable environment for educators to work in. Job security can be awful, and pay for effort put forth is less than adequate in many cases.

    Ultimately though, a point in the middle of the extreme opinions posted here will prevail. Students will be expected in many ways to carry on as they always have and many old teaching methods will survive (as they should). New processes and methods will come about though, and educators will evolve (and are doing so). It will work out in the end, largely due to discussions like these. Keep it coming.

  12. Korey says:

    This video is exactly what college to me is. I did not realize how much wasted time is spent on a class that is not going to teach me skills in my field or learn math equations that are “fluff” material to fill up a class. I have adjusted to life now but I honestly do not under why I need to go to College to be considered a successful person in today’s society.

    Has anyone really stopped to think that the “education system” and “prison system” is run almost exactly the same?

    For example, a large group of selected individuals who are put together for long amounts of time. I understand that the difference between criminals and college students but I feel like I am doing tasks just to waste my time.

    I enjoy learning and that is why I choose to go to college. The only problem is the millions of other students who feel the same but are forced to endure somewhere around 4, 6, 8, or 10 years of material when most classes they took because they need to have a certain amount of credits.

  13. Mark Callan says:

    The Video has turned from an semi-objective observation into a self help video. I cant empathize with people who don’t understand why there taking classes while using the standard argument ” If this isn’t my field or specialty then why do I need to take it.” Seriously, If your an impressionable student what makes you think that you don’t need to take it. That mentality shows a lack of foresight and is the hallmark of a closed mind.

    Others have mentioned faults and setbacks of our education system. Our education SYSTEM is indeed a system you will literally get out as much as you put in. No matter how much you yell and rant about how unfair, inefficient, and unbalanced the education system eventually only you will be held accountable for what you did or did not choose to learn.

    As far as technology is concerned, it is just another means to an end. The Greeks complained about humans losing our memory and not learning because people began to write things down. Now people are getting bent out of shape now that people email notes and lecture via video conference. It’s just another medium. Not a substitution. More than 3000 years later we can still memorize our phone numbers AND write them down too. wow. and as those of use who DON’T memorize because they have wikipedia and awesome “information retrieval skills” Good for you, go ahead and try finding living as a human filing cabinet.

  14. Josh says:

    Mark Callan (Response #84) makes some good points. I’m a firm believer in “what you put in is what you get out.” I’m not sure we can really judge how these issues of technology combining with education are going to effect the future.

    Sure, we’re multi-tasking our brains away and we go to the internet for just about everything, but does that mean we can’t fuction when we loose an internet connection? Possibly, if you’re narrow minded enough, then yes you could be rendered useless.

    But alternatively, it could be leading us towards a future where communication between people working in distant places flows naturally or ideas are expressed easily through online mediums of communication.

    I’m not trying to say I like dealing with computers all day. I guess I’m just playing devil’s advocate and saying something good might come out of this.

    As much as I don’t like taking classes that are closely related to my major, I can see why we have to take them. My school wants me to be as diversified and educated as possible. They’re trying to show me as much as they can to help me figure out what my future in that career could be like.

    The liberal art courses are there to force you to become educated on things you might not consider learning but could benefit you in the future.

    For example, a mechanical engineering technologist who is required to take liberal arts classes would want to look into economics classes, which I plan to do.

    I enjoyed watching this video and it really enlightens you to some things about the current education system and the students using it, but it doesn’t really suggest solutions to the problems. When does that video come out?

  15. Peter C(RIT) says:

    I like the points made in post number 2, which look at the piece in a negative aspect. This post seems to look at the video as people complaining about their lives being hard and difficult today, and maybe even unfair. However, everything mentioned in the video can be changed, and the students that made the video probably have the best ability to change the world, and mainly the topics mentioned, but noone does anything. They complain that their average class size is 115, and that few of their teachers know their name, but they dont try and change it. Well, if they join some kind of student government or something, and become an active voice, they could probably work on getting the class sizes changed. This will require a strong argument as to why it is necessary, but i think there is one. Someone just needs to do something about it. GThe next part says that they read only half of their reading assignments, 26% which are relevant, and that they buy 100 dollar textbooks that theyll never use. Well, do the same thing as i just said for the first part, but try and get the textbooks assigned for classes to be more relevant. This will make the books be used for the money they cost, make the reading all relevant, and make the people read the assigned material, as it will be necessary for the class. Everything mentioned can be changed, action just needs to be taken to do it. Complaining over the internet wont do a thing.

  16. Deep Rana (kishor) says:

    I am responding to response made in No 82, I totally agree with it. The video was made really good and shows various issues that we students face in our day to day college life. There were various points that students showed in the video that falls in my interest. I come from a third world country too and here people also earn less than a 1 dollar a day. After graduation from college, getting a job is almost impossible. It doesn’t even matter whether you have a good GPA throughout academic career, it is still more likely to end up with no job at all. Source force plays a major role in my country for getting a job. In addition, even if you do get a job, your maximum earning would be about $500 a month from which you can save only $100 in average. Besides these issues in my country, students do not have to face most of the issues presented in the video. Education is not expensive, especially the materials like books. When I first saw the price of the book here in the states, I was shocked. I could not swallow the price because I was so used to the price of the book in my country and it felt insanely expensive and unreasonable. The book, which cost $150, would only cost $10 in my country. One part, when the student says that he will be in debt over $20,000 after graduation made me feel really bad. It is so true, especially in the U.S. It is almost every student is in debt with the government after they graduate. And all they can do after their graduation is start thinking about getting a job as soon as possible and get the debts off of their heads. Isn’t this sad for all those students who have to go through this? Rather to get a chance to think about how to plan their careers ahead, they have to think about how to get clear of their debts. But one thing I don’t understand is how will the technology save us from this situations. I believe it is the whole systems of the government that needs to be brought to attention to solve these issues not the technology. Students here in the states get so many facilities that normally other schools of Third world and Second world countries do not get. The technology has already made their life as easy as it can be and yet they complain about it, just because they do not know how to utilize it. Is not the technology’s fault if we bring our laptop in class and surf facebook, it is our own responsibility to do our work assigned by the professors and keep up with the materials. “There is always a price to pay for something”.

    82Joe

    I work at a liberal arts college for Instructional Technology. I come from a family of educated people and grew up surrounded by friends and family who work as Teachers, Academic Administrators and Researchers.

    It’s been interesting to see the reaction to this video and to the response posted by the Lecturer from the UK. I think this debate is both old and new, but mostly old.

    First I think most generations of young people have some (greater or lesser) sense of entitlement, but I would say I believe the current generations of young people have a strong one. I would say though that it is coupled with a drive that will show itself as they age and produce many positive solutions to the things they now bicker about.

    Second, I think educators and older generations are not always given much credit by the young – this is by no means a new thing. History certainly shows us this is common.

    As far as technology’s impact on education – I think it’s undeniable. I work in a fairly traditional school but most faculty here use technology (even if it’s just a projector) on a daily basis. Online course management systems, computer software, video and audio, etc… are common in many schools in the US.

    A few people have made comments which suggest that young people’s technology use leads to less contact with people. I do not think this is true. Many of the most popular sites with young people connect them to others that they would otherwise only have written correspondence with. At my school, programs like Skype have been used to connect students here with professors and students in foreign countries via webcam and live audio – certainly an enriching and educational experience that could not otherwise take place.

    I do think that many American students are ungrateful for what they are offered. I also think that saying someone in another country has it much worse (which is very true) doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try to make things here even better. I do think we need to be careful to tell students up front that a college education guarantees absolutely nothing. Your life becomes what you put into it in effort, not money. I’m not sure college recruiters are too up front about that. I also think we need a more stable environment for educators to work in. Job security can be awful, and pay for effort put forth is less than adequate in many cases.

    Ultimately though, a point in the middle of the extreme opinions posted here will prevail. Students will be expected in many ways to carry on as they always have and many old teaching methods will survive (as they should). New processes and methods will come about though, and educators will evolve (and are doing so). It will work out in the end, largely due to discussions like these. Keep it coming

  17. Kane (RIT) says:

    Response to number 5. I can agree with this response. Everyone has control over what they spend their time on. I feel that the students in this video are just complaining about doing homework. Every student needs to learn how to manage their time and to get the work done that is needed. You don’t go to college for no reason, you are there to learn and to get into a good job. Whatever a student puts into life, they will get back in return.
    The time on the facebook or the time spen surfing the internet can be reduced. Students are coming up with excuses as to why they arn’t getting their homework done or as to why they arn’t getting enough sleep. Students need to realize that they are going to school for a reason, to better themselves. There is no since in going to college if you are not doing what you are suppose to or learning the material that you need to learn.

  18. Dogukan T (RIT) says:

    To agree the idea of post number 24, I can say that technology is a “tool.” Technology is a “tool” created and developed by human being to both to ease the life and to make it practical. We use email instead of mail, because of its speed and reliablity. We do not have to write a paper twice to remember what we wrote last time during reponding to a message. Technology copies it for us. Why do we use facebook, hi5, myspace? To keep in touch with friends and virtually live together, so that we do not miss them when we are apart. But, it is out of question that some of us embrace the virtual life as their real life. They spend hours and hours sitting in front of bright screen waiting a message from a friend, or a picture upload by a friend! Thus, they end up with having no time for real life work. I use technology as a tool by shopping online, reading news, following my courses, watching movies, etc… It is time consuming to wait shuttle to go to the mall and do the shopping. It is expensive to buy newspapers everyday, instead I prefer reading the news on free sites. It goes on like this…

    Time is money! I spend less time by using internet to print out a research paper for manufacturing processes. On the other side, huge library of RIT is just a few miles away.

    Use technology as a tool and do not let your tools to you!

  19. Dogukan T (RIT) says:

    To agree the idea of post number 24, I can say that technology is a “tool.” Technology is a “tool” created and developed by human being both to ease the life and to make it practical. We use email instead of mail because of its speed and reliablity. We do not have to write a paper twice to remember what we last time wrote. Technology copies it for us. Why do we use facebook, hi5, myspace? We do to keep in touch with friends and virtually live together, so that we do not miss them when we are apart. But, it is out of question that some of us embrace the virtual lives as their real lives. They spend hours sitting in front of a bright screen waiting for a message from a friend, or a picture upload by a friend! Thus, they end up with having no time for real life work. I use technology as a tool by shopping online, reading news, following my courses, watching movies, etc. It is time consuming to wait for a shuttle to go to the mall and do the shopping. It is expensive to buy newspapers everyday,so I prefer reading the news on free sites. I can give more examples, yet you can hear what I try to say.

    Time is the money! I spend less time by using internet to print out a research paper for manufacturing processes than using RIT’s huge library, which is just a few miles away.

    To sum up, use the technology as a tool, and do not let your tools use you!

  20. Sun Woo says:

    Response to post number 6. I agree and understand your point, with all these electronic devices make the students get distracted pretty easily, and certainly I can say that we cannot blame the system or life. It is the motivation that keeps us from continuing and achieving our everyday goals. Students are the one’s responsible for their own actions; they control their own destiny, not others. In order to succeed in life, you need follow up the rules of the system so later in the future you can be on top of everything. Furthermore, technology is there for us to use it for our education needs, most students tend to abuse technology and use it as entertainment source. I believe that students must be focused on academics and stop blaming technology, because there are people who are successful in terms of academics even though they’re surrounded by these distractions. So I highly recommend people to stay motivated and be determined of what they want, because that’s how life works. If you know what you want for sure, you’ll get it.

  21. Adhiraj Mathur (RIT) says:

    Post no. 5 is very true. As this is a progressing world there will be many more ‘new stuff’ coming along. This means people will be distracted even more ? No, i dont think so. People have their own life to handle, and they should do so by prioritizing whats imp. and what is not. Brousing FaceBook in class is not a bad thing, but should be just done if the student knows his course work well and does not slack in class. People who read a lot is a good trainer for vocabularly and english or their language, however, reading course books is as important, which is lost in the current world. Some students dont even have the motivation to go for early classes, the most common response i have heard is, ‘ oh, i slept in late, damn, but there is no point of me going to class anyways as i dont understand anything and i didnt do my homework either. So if i go i wont understand any thing and just waste my time’. This means that the person is not at all motivated and does not want to push himself either. Not doing HW is fine, or not understanding course work is also common, but not going to class for that reason is nonsense. Where else would u get the knowledge about course work from, if not in class which u pay for.

  22. Peter Tarnawskyj says:

    I agree to post number 8….the fact that he is on face book 98 percent of the time he is at class. I dont bring my computer to class but when I get back from class everyday I always go on facebook and see who is on there or what new requests I have gotten. There are many more matters that are worse than facebook. They are the cost of textbooks. Comon, they are rediculious. Some kids take out entire college loans just to afford text books becasue they cost about $300 a quarter. I feel that there is some kind of scam or whatever going on with this. I think that with the amount of money we pay a year we should be given a text for everyclass and told that if we ruin it or lose it we need to pay the $150 cost. That is another thing that is just crazy. Also, who needs to spend 3.5 hours online everyday. Checking e mail is one thing but writing a paper does not count as going online. Some people need to get a better focus on their schooling. I hav e met some kids that are happy with a 2.0GPA and my question is…If your spend all of this money, why wouldnt you try hard and do well? There are a lot of flaws int he schooling system. But I could go on all day about those.

  23. Matt (RIT) says:

    This video hits a lot of points that I agree with. The cost of books for example, are outragously expensive and aren’t even included in tuition. College is already expensive as is. Starting off with over $100,000 in debt once you get out of college is going to to be hell. You have to have enough money to eat, get an apartment, gas money, clothing, other activities, and pay off the $100,000 debt. Not too many people straight out of college can make that kind of money for atleast a couple of years. All I’m saying is that college is too expensive already and to have to pay for extra stuff like books I don’t have to read for a class would make life a lot easier down the road and getting out of debt. I do agree that if we spend this much money that we should get the best education out of it instead of wasting all of the money we just borrowed.

  24. Wuttachki(RIT) says:

    My response is to this excerpt from the video,

    “I did not create the problems. But they are my problems.”

    I agree this statement because i believe it’s correct. the problems on this planet were here long before I existed. the problems that continue to plague humans all around the world. even though the problems were here before, that doesn’t that they don’t affect me. i have to deal with them like any other person in these circumstances. i have to find a way around so i can come out on top. this is what the excerpt means to me, somehow i have to take some responsibility for these problems so that will allow me to find a way to make it so it will not consume me like its constantly doing. this except relates to all the other ones in that the other excerpts point out the problems that exist. Now that we’ve identified the problems, its time we worked on the solutions.

  25. From #5, “The reason you spend so much time in Facebook,or playing with your laptops is because you’re too friggin lazy to concentrate on your classes.”

    I can not disagree with that statement entirely, but for just a minute, let’s look at things before Facebook. Were our parents so much more intent in class because of the absence of laptops? Are we lazy because of Facebook?

    I think the point here is how well do we value our education. Clearly coming from a country where the typical worker could only dream of spending $134,000+ dollars on an education, the value of education is worth that of a lifetime of work and even more.

    What we can learn from the migration of Facebook into the classroom, is that the education system is relatively static in relation to surrounding advancements. Students come from their climate controlled dorms where they hold friendships on different continents, can start wars with 63 other people in 63 different locations. Then they must gear down to a lecture class with 399 other students–and environment that has not changed in many decades.

    The question now, is it good that we have a stable and universal education system, or bad?

  26. Travis Atkinson (rit) says:

    i personaly don’t much care for facebook or myspace and i don’t go on the internet in class (because i don’t own a laptop)

    i guess i agree with korey (#83) that school does give alot of fluff that we really don’t need or use ever again after school. (to those of you that are RIT: like the ghost map stuff)

    i think that education does need reformations because of how much the world has changed due to technology. but the question is, what can we do to change it? i don’t think that there is a system that is perfect or close enough to perfect to cover all of the changing information in the world. all that we can really do is keep learning after school so thta we don’t fall behind.

  27. Chris says:

    5Mangimosbi

    I come from a country in which a majority of people earn less than 1 dollar a day and I say what are you complaining about.

    The reason you spend so much time in Facebook,or playing with your laptops is because you’re too friggin lazy to concentrate on your classes.

    Surely students must take some of the blame for not doing well in school or not being motivated enough to do their required readings etc.You are the master of your own destiny.You only get out of life what you put into it.All of us have spent hours doing assigned readings that really didn’t help much etc thats life.

    Wow sucks for you. But I believe that is the reason you should try harder to get your education, so you can help out your family.

    I for one do not play around on my laptop during class, nor skip class, because you are paying a lot of money and it is a stupid reason to lose points on your grade. Some classes are dreadfully boring but I try my best to stay awake.

    I also agree that students should take some of the blame for not learning. I myself am guilty of not doing some readings, or not doing homework that the teacher collects. But I made sure to seek the help I need. I am also not the one to complain, because that do not help much I just get my revenge with the evaluations at the end of the course. And for global warming I feel that we can all do our part but cutting down on our needless consumptions

  28. Zack says:

    It’s all sad, but it’s all true.
    It isn’t all our fault.

  29. can not disagree with that statement entirely, but for just a minute, let’s look at things before Facebook. Were our parents so much more intent in class because of the absence of laptops? Are we lazy because of Facebook?

    I think the point here is how well do we value our education. Clearly coming from a country where the typical worker could only dream of spending $134,000+ dollars on an education, the value of education is worth that of a lifetime of work and even more.

  30. Donnie Smith says:

    Hi, I’m an instructor ar Butler Community College. I wanted to let you all know that I really enjoyed you “student’s vision today” video. In fact, I showed my students and they knew a few of the students in the video. I embedded the video into my website at http://learnautobody.com on the students link. Anyway, great video.

  31. notold says:

    Just a thought: if you’re not going to read your $100 textbooks, don’t buy them. If you’re not going to pay attention in class, don’t go. If you don’t want to be in college–get a job, travel, be a bum on your mom’s couch where you can devote the entirety of those 26.5 hours cruising facebook. Eventually, eventually, you may actually CHOOSE to pick up a book, you may get sick enough of your crappy job to recognize the importance of gaining skills, you may see enough of the world to want to find ways to solve its (‘your’?!?) problems. If you look up from the screen long enough to learn about the big, bad world out there, you may actually (hopefully, for all our sake) come up with a way to use the internet for a greater good than facebook.

  32. jane says:

    Students come in all shapes and sizes. They also have individual needs. Sometimes they just need a little help getting started.

  33. sandra says:

    Frustrating? yes, at all levels. But, ultimately are we, or are we not responsible for our own actions? No one is being FORCED to attend college – it is a choice, one that many in the world do not have.
    Put down the phone, log off MySpace and make that choice count. Only once around for each of us – no guarantees, no promises of a long life – if you are going to do it, then do it to the best of your ability. If not, don’t cry about it – get a job at McD’s and call your friends as much as you want..

  34. Larry says:

    I am a returning student, out for 25 years. When i originally went to college I spent most of my time, drinking in the campus lounge, playing pool and skipping class. I was lazy and did not want to be there.

    I was lucky to get a job and have been there since, but not for long. My children (2) are now starting the same journey that most of you current students are already in the middle of. But as i mentioned earlier, my job won’t be there much longer. I have huge debt that will not just go away. 2 jobs and school and I don’t see it getting any easier!

    This is why I’m back in school. I see young faces every day with fear and passion all in the same smile. I can relate to many of the comments referring to: just being a number, what is our future going to be like, work – school – for what, boredom of education, all of these feelings are present and fair. There will be less jobs available for you and people like myself.

    I think you have to look at education as a way to make you a better person and at some point you can make your mark in the world. It most likely won’t be a world changing discovery or a cure for the common cold but it will be seen by your family. I can already see the difference in my children knowing that Dad is trying to make a difference in his life.

    Don’t get bored, keep your mind fresh, even if it some mind numbing stats class or a econ class that puts you to sleep every time. I gave up early in my life (in college) and it is finally beginning to haunt me. If you fight it now, I fully believe that you will succeed in what path you choose. Sorry for my pedestal but this is how i feel. Good Luck to all!

  35. Tony Mayo says:

    Fantastic message and well presented. I am forwarding it to the executives I coach.

    BTW, would you provide a citation for the McLuhan quote.

  36. Michael says:

    Just a quick question….

    At the end of the “A Vision of Students Today” video, there is brief mention of a continuation discussing the benefits of a chalkboard…I would be incredibly interested in seeing whatever came from that, as I am trying very hard to have conversations with professors showing that Power Point is often not the best way to go about learning something!

    If anyone knows where to find the continued video, or if one was even made, I’d appreciate the help!

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  41. Matt says:

    Your video was very informative, unfortunatley I felt a mixed vibe from the video. The mention of students being in debt went directly into people around the world making less than a dollar a day. I did not see how that pertained to this video at all. Overall it had a good message about dehumanization of things though.

  42. Melissa says:

    I think this video is very eye-opening to the facts of students today. The fact about the bokos we buy but never open is true for a lot of my classes and books. I also liked the fact of how busy college students are and how all the hours add up to be more than 24 hours. I really liked the sign that said we did not create the problems but we have to deal with them and then a bunch of signs about war and ethnic conflict were held up. Facebook was another thing that I was glad was brought up because a lot of students are on facebook a lot of times during the day and during classes. All in all, the video made me think and realize some things so very well done.

  43. Vazhin says:

    This video is so true. I am the neighbor that doesn’t show up because I feel I learn more by myself and I haven’t even opened up some of my theology books. I think that the time studying should be higher than what was shown and teh time sleeping less though. But other than that i thnk that it was very accurate.

  44. Aisha says:

    I thought the video was very interesting. It made me think about alot in my everyday life. I could relate to just about everything mentioned. The message was great and well presented.

  45. Katie says:

    I agree with this video. I text throughout some of my classes and although i do not take a laptop to class i allow other people’s activities to distract me. I also do not use all of my 100 dollar books and i think that is a waste of money. I also missed having time to sit down and read a book for fun. I should get off facebook and read my book instead of wasting my time. A lot of the numbers were really eye opening.

  46. Dan says:

    The video is very effective in its ability to bring up real issues, both those that are facing college students each day and making a point of how small they are compared to the bigger issues facing the rest of the world. We are the lucky ones.

  47. rebecca says:

    i believe that this is a correct assesment of the corruption in college. the struggles we face in and out of the classrooms which mold our grades and lives are all stemmed from something related to academics. we spend some much time on facebook or myspace when when you think about what those sites actually are, you realize that the morals of it are very creepy.

  48. Colleen says:

    I really liked the layout of the video. I liked that it was in an actual college lecture hall, just like the one that I take classes in and I liked that they used college students of all backgrrounds to convey the message. It was giving the profile of teh average college student through the voice of many. I agree with most of the statistics presented, either for myself or for someone that I know. There is not enough time in the day to get everything done that I want to get done at college and sometimes I might never crack open a book that I paid a hundred dollars for.

  49. greg says:

    The video is very effective in bringing about important issues that deal with technology. Although these issues are very real, it seems that the makers of the video make them seem like a bigger problem than they actually are. Everyone has multitasked all their lives

  50. Tara says:

    I really loved how this video was created, i thought it was very unique which made it interesting for me to watch. Overall in the beginning of the video it seemed to me like something that was made for older parents and teachers teaching them about what it was like to be a student in today’s world, however towards the end it changed drastically to much more serious problems and this is what got me lost. I didn’t really understand the final message although i do realize it is about how technology is effecting us today. And I definitaly think that what they found was true, i know people who don’t go to class and who facebook during lectures and its daunting to realize that we do read more facebook profiles and emails than we do actual books. so overall i thought it was really interestingly made, true at most parts, but the end just confused me.

  1. October 21, 2007

    [...] The Transcript You may also want to browse: Guelph Memory, An Interesting Take on del.icio.us, Mapping Imperial Pretensions,  [...]

  2. October 22, 2007

    [...] A vision on A Vision of Students Today 22 10 2007 Gerry McCusker directed me to “A Vision of Students Today” on YouTube – created by Michael Wesch and 200 students on the Introduction to Cultural Anthropology course at Kansas State University. [...]

  3. October 22, 2007

    [...] Transcript [...]

  4. October 23, 2007

    [...] 200 estudiantes de la Universidad de Arkansas desarrollaron el script y video que vereis a continuación. En el se reseñan muchos hechos y situaciones que los estudiantes viven día a día. Lo interesante es que presenta muchos datos de una manera atractiva, sin utilizar infografía o gráficos, sino presentándolos de manera convincente y personal a través del puño y letra (o notebook) de cada uno de los estudiantes. [...]

  5. October 25, 2007

    [...] Mehr dazu gibts im Digital Ethnography Blog. [...]

  6. October 26, 2007

    [...] Michael Wesch and the KSU digital ethnography crew also posted this video on the same day as “A Vision of Students Today.” [...]

  7. October 27, 2007

    [...] Here’s a video that recently did the rounds with the edubloggers. (I can’t access it in China at the moment - transcript is here.) It was produced by Michael Wesch, assistant professor of Cultural Anthropology as Kansas State University.   [...]

  8. October 27, 2007

    [...] YouTube – A Vision of Students Today is another video from the Digital Ethnography folks at Kansas State. (Remember Your Moment of Inspiration?) This one has students holding up pages or laptops with messages about students, the web and learning. The script is on the Mediated Cultures site. I love the creativity of how they are using video in class and for class. It feels participatory – by students, for students, and about students. Digital Ethnography indeed. [...]

  9. October 30, 2007

    [...] For those interested in the revolution in communications, technology, and culture, Wesch has made the text of the video available here. Wesch’s students have put together about 30 videos that anthropologically explore different aspects communication via platforms like YouTube. It serves as a metaphor for interative digital communication and community. You might also like Wesch’s introduction to Web 2.0. [...]

  10. October 30, 2007

    [...] A vision of students today [...]

  11. October 30, 2007

    [...] The group of 200 college students surveyed themselves and collaborated to arrive at some interesting conclusions.  Here are some media-related highlights from the transcript: [...]

  12. November 1, 2007

    [...] En A Vision of the students today, son alumnos de esa misma universidad, aunque no necesariamente en respuesta al vídeo anterior, quienes muestran cuál es su contexto de aprendizaje como universitarios. [...]

  13. November 4, 2007

    [...] Of special interest is the blog that Wesch is running, that I was, until today, unaware of.  It’s called Digital Ethnography and there is a single blog entry that includes the transcript from the video and also background information.  An excellent watch and another likely intro to more professional development institutes.  [...]

  14. November 5, 2007

    [...] See the background in this Wired article and more discussion here (and dig that groovy WordPress theme they’re using). [...]

  15. November 5, 2007

    [...] A transcript is available on the class blog. [...]

  16. November 7, 2007

    [...] También puedes leer la transcripción del video [...]

  17. November 10, 2007

    [...] del.icio.us The academic perspective Nov10 10 November 2007, Gráinne @ 11:53 am The student experience? What about the academicperspective? Following on from Michael Wesch’s ‘A vision of students today’, now read ‘A Vision of professors today’. Alarmingly realistic!!! Write a comment [...]

  18. November 30, 2007

    Detained students may receive degrees…

    Detained students may receive degreesOregon Daily Emerald, OR -13 hours agoA bill that passed unanimously in the Oregon House one week ago,…

  19. December 8, 2007

    [...] “A Vision of Students Today” Transcript [...]

  20. December 8, 2007

    [...] “A Vision of Students Today” Transcript [...]

  21. January 20, 2008

    [...] To mark Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday, here is a new video (or a video response to Michael Wesch’s “A Vision of Students Today“) [transcript here] (Re)Vision of Students Today collaborates with Michael Wesch’s Kansas State students, who, according to the megapopular video, used Google Docs to collaboratively edit a document, essentially conducting a survey and, presumably, designing the video itself. [...]

  22. February 5, 2008

    baths prices…

  23. April 7, 2008

    [...] system they have to go through. To illustrate this point brilliantly he uses the great video A Vision of Students Today from the Digital Ethnography project at Kansas State University. The video tells us lots of things [...]

  24. June 30, 2008

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